A Device to Detect ‘Aggression’ in Schools Often Misfires

This story was co-published with ProPublica. Ariella Russcol specializes in drama at the Frank Sinatra School of the Arts in Queens, New York, and the senior’s performance on this April afternoon didn’t disappoint. While the library is normally the quietest room in the school, her ear-piercing screams sounded more like a horror movie than study hall. But they weren’t enough to set off a small microphone in the ceiling that was supposed to detect aggression. A few days later, at the Staples Pathways Academy in Westport, Connecticut, junior Sami D’Anna inadvertently triggered the same device with a less spooky sound—a coughing fit from a lingering chest cold. As she hacked and rasped, a message popped up on its web interface: …

Dont Get Under The Table: Teacher Shares Tips On Staying Alive If An Active Shooter Is Nearby

Americans of an earlier generation will probably remember the ‘duck and cover’ type of safety drills at school, a somewhat optimistic protection measure in the event of an atomic explosion. While the threat of nuclear annihilation has subsided somewhat, many residents of the ‘land of the free’ still live with a nagging undercurrent of fear, highlighted by this Twitter thread by “V” ( “I received active shooter training at work today that I feel will save my life in the unfortunate (and likely) event that someone will open fire in public so I’m gonna share my takeaways. Some stuff is obvious, the rest might not be,” she wrote. lareinavicc After being taken to task for her “and likely” comment, she …