Why dont doctors trust women? Because they dont know much about us | Gabrielle Jackson

The medical community have known for a century that women are living in constant pain. Theyve done nothing about it Its frustrating to have questions that dont get answered. Its altogether disturbing to find out that those questions havent even been asked. When I was diagnosed with endometriosis at age 23, I didnt know enough to ask the right questions. I assumed my gynaecologist had all the answers, and listened carefully to his thoughtful explanations. I thought I knew it all. Or at least that he knew it all. But I was wrong. It was only after more than a decade of feeling weak, second-rate, wimpy and affect at least 50 million US women alone. I discovered that some of …

The science of addiction: a personal struggle to kick cocaine gives a neuroscientist unique insights

Having survived a decade of drink and drugs as a young woman, Professor Judith Grisel focused all her determination on writing a book about addiction When guardianbookshop.com

Drug maker ‘will make $21bn from treating cystic fibrosis’

Vertex is accused of raking in vast profits while making Orkambi unaffordable to NHS A US company, which is refusing to drop its price for the life-changing cystic fibrosis drug Orkambi to make it affordable to NHS England, is set to make $21bn (17bn) in profit from that and a sister medicine, according to research. Countries around the world are struggling to pay for Orkambi, made by Vertex, which has a list price of 104,000 per patient per year and is not a cure. The National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (Nice) in England has said effective. On Monday, the Scottish Medicines Consortium will decide whether to approve the drug for children. Parents in England have campaigned, demonstrated on …

Poisoned Air in Paris, Intel’s New Chips, and More News

Paris is dealing with dangerous lead poisoning, Intel has a new set of chips, and Greenland is in the midst of a dangerous heat wave. Here's the news you need to know, in two minutes or less. Want to receive this two-minute roundup as an email every weekday? Sign up here! Today's Headlines The Notre Dame fire spread toxic lead dust over Paris Three months after the devastating Notre Dame cathedral fire, reports show that lead-poisoning tests in some locations surrounding the cathedral are registering 500 to 800 times the official safe level. Two months ago, Paris officials apparently told local schools that there was no significant health risk. Intels new chips have finally arrived For months, Intel has been …

Americans Trust Scientists, Until Politics Gets in the Way

Nothing’s more American than a science-hero—an indomitable, big-brained hasher-out of ideas that change the world, that make the impossible possible. At least since Ben Franklin sat with the founders, and certainly since Vannevar Bush explicitly connected the US’ future to federal funding of science after World War II, the idea of sciencing the shit out of everything has been core to the American character. Like many surveys and studies before it, a new report from the Pew Research Center confirms this truth: Americans love and trust scientists. In 2019, 86 percent of Americans said they had a great deal or a fair amount of confidence in them—up 3 percent from the year before. That’s higher than confidence in the military …

The Notre Dame Fire Spread Toxic Lead Dust Over Paris

This story originally appeared on CityLab and is part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Three months after the devastating fire at Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris, reports of a new, previously unheeded threat to local residents have emerged: lead poisoning. According to confidential documents leaked to the (paywalled) website Mediapart earlier this month and discussed across French media, locations surrounding the fire-damaged cathedral have registered levels of lead contamination ranging between 500 and 800 times the official safe level. The building’s roof and spire were clad in several hundred tons of the metal, which can be toxic if particles are inhaled or consumed, especially to children. The blaze that consumed the cathedral’s roof liquified oceans of lead and lofted a plume …

What Happens When Reproductive Tech Like IVF Goes Awry?

It sounds like the setup to a bad joke: Three couples walk into a fertility clinic. But the punch line—what happened to those families at one Los Angeles medical facility in August 2018—is no laughing matter. The embryos from two couples hoping to conceive were mistakenly implanted into a third patient. That third woman and her husband, both of Korean descent, suspected that something was amiss when their two newborns didn’t look anything like them. DNA testing confirmed that Baby A and Baby B (as court documents called them) weren’t genetically related to either of the birth parents, or to each other—they were related to two other couples who had been seeking fertility treatments at the same clinic. The birth …

Elon’s Brain Computer, Big Tech’s Big Day in Congress, and More News

Elon Musk unveiled a plan to thread wires through your brain, there's finally a way to automatically cancel free trials, and tech execs took the congressional stand. Here's the news you need to know, in two minutes or less. Want to receive this two-minute roundup as an email every weekday? Sign up here! Today's Headlines Elon Musk is planning to stitch a computer into your brain Last night, Elon Musk presented the first product from his company Neurolink: a tiny computer chip attached to ultra-fine, electrode-studded wires, stitched into living brains by a robot. If the technology works, it will pick up signals from across your brain and translate them into code to do things like control a computer, or …

Not Everyone on 23andMe Will Get the Latest Gene Chip Updates

If you were early to the 23andMe spit party, you’ve probably noticed that you haven’t gotten any new reports about your genes from the company in a while. Not like more recent customers, whose inboxes receive the results of such analyses on the regular—like one with more specific ancestry estimates, which came out last year, or this one, for risk of type 2 diabetes, which arrived in March. You haven’t gotten them because 23andMe, like most other direct-to-consumer DNA companies, untangles your genetic secrets using a relatively inexpensive technology called genotyping. Instead of sequencing all 6.4 billion base pairs of DNA, it takes strategic snapshots at just a few hundred thousand locations across the genome, looking at the different, important, …

Gulf Fisheries Are Under SiegeNow Comes Tropical Storm Barry

This story originally appeared on HuffPost and is part of the Climate Desk collaboration. As fishermen deep in the Louisiana bayou, Kindra Arnesen and her family have faced their share of life-altering challenges in recent years. First came Hurricane Katrina, the 2005 monster storm that devastated her small fishing community in Plaquemines Parish before roaring up the Gulf Coast, killing more than 1,800 people and destroying $125 billion in property. Five years later, BP’s Deepwater Horizon drilling rig exploded 40 miles offshore, spewing nearly 200 million gallons of crude. The fisheries have not fully recovered more than nine years later, nor has her family. But this year may be worse. A historic slow-moving flood of polluted Mississippi River water loaded …

Why We See the Colors of Faces Differently Than Other Things

As setups go for studying how people see colors, this one isn’t even the weirdest: a room full of assorted objects, like Lego bricks, strawberries, and ping-pong balls. Bring people into the room and give them a computer. Tell them to use a mouse to adjust the color of a big spot on the screen, like a color-picker tool in reverse. Then a researcher would point at one of the objects and say, basically, make that spot on the computer be the same color. Easy, right? The yellow Lego, the red strawberry, the white ping-pong ball. That’s what color vision is for after all. It uses the photoreceptors at the back of your eyeballs and a lot of computational neurocircuitry …

The Strange Saga of the Butt Plug Turned Research Device

Take it from sex researcher Nicole Prause: Cobbling together an orgasm detector that works on both men and women ain’t easy. You at least know that it has to go in the anus to detect the muscle contractions that the sexes share, so you begin with a butt plug. Many butt plugs, actually. “We ordered like 20 of these butt plugs off Amazon, and it messed up my recommendation engine for all time,” Prause says. To the butt plugs Prause added piezoelectric discs, which detect deformation. In the anus the device goes, and voilà: You’ve got a way to uniformly measure the physiology of orgasms. Alas, a complication: “The device was made for sexual stimulation, so it was sloped both …

A Deadly Tick Virus, Extreme Seasonal Weirdness, and More News

A deadly tick can make you allergic to bacon and carries a mystery virus, cities are turning to Waze for help with car accidents, and you might be paying too much for your PlayStation 4. Here's the news you need to know, in two minutes or less. Want to receive this two-minute roundup as an email every weekday? Sign up here! Today's Headlines This meat-allergy tick also carries a mysterious killer virus. The Lone Star tick, famous for making people suddenly allergic to red meat, has a new weapon: the Bourbon virus. Scientists know little about how the Bourbon virus behaves, but they do know it can kill you, and they worry that it could be silently spreading through human …

Wide Sargasso seaweed: 5,500-mile algae belt keeps on growing

Great Atlantic Sargassum Belt now appears almost every year, forming largest record bloom It weighs 20m tonnes, stretches from west Africa to the Gulf of Mexico, and washes up on beaches creating a malodorous stench. Now scientists say a vast swathe of brown seaweed could be becoming an annual occurrence. Researchers say the explosion in sargassum seaweed first materialised in 2011. But new research shows it has appeared almost every year since then, forming the largest bloom of macroalgae ever recorded. Whats more, the seaweed band dubbed the Great Atlantic Sargassum Belt seems to be getting bigger. The scientists say the seaweed can be a boon for marine wildlife, providing habitat for creatures including fish and birds. But it also …

How Extreme Heat Overwhelms Your Body and Becomes Deadly

The heat wave that scorched Europe last week felt like a red alert of climate change. Death Valley was cooler than southern France, where temperatures reached a record-breaking 114.6 degrees Fahrenheit. But as the heat broke and returned to the relatively temperate 80s, another forewarning emerged. Civilizations need to adapt and protect themselves from extreme heat. More than anyone, the French are aware of just how deadly extreme heat can be. In 2003, a heat wave lasting two weeks killed an estimated 15,000 people in France—and 70,000 throughout Europe. By comparison, this June heat wave lasted just four days. It will take time for authorities to determine the “excess mortality” it caused, but the precautions, including cooling centers and misting …

A New Approach to Treat Mental Illness: Electrical Engineering

Brain disorders impact more than 25 percent of Americans, and such disorders are projected to cost more than one trillion dollars annually by 2050. In response, the federal government launched the Brain Research Through Advancing Innovative Nanotechnologies (BRAIN) initiative in 2013 to uncover how the human brain works as an electrical machine. This group of researchers has been tasked with answering the following question: What if mental illness could be treated with electrical engineering? While the human brain contains nearly 100 billion cells that create and process electricity, human brain augmentation has largely been limited to drugs that target brain chemicals. By discovering how the brain computes, we hope scientists will be able to develop new treatments and bend the projected …