How we made Quadrophenia, by Phil Daniels and Leslie Ash

Riding the scooter along the clifftop at Beachy Head, I got too close and fell off Phil Daniels, played Jimmy I wasnt well when I went for the auditions at Shepperton Studios in Surrey. Id been in South Africa filming Beachy Head. Riding along the clifftop, I got a lot closer to the edge than I was meant to and fell off the scooter a couple of times. I remember the first assistant director, Ray Corbett, telling me: Listen, its the third day. If you fell off that cliff, dyou know what would have happened? They would have recast you tomorrow. Jimmys not a hero, hes just a normal boy next door, and thats what makes him work. He ultimately …

Daniel Johnston, cult US indie songwriter, dies aged 58

Manager confirms Johnston, whose naive songwriting was beloved of Kurt Cobain, died of a heart attack Daniel Johnston, an eccentric, enduring and much beloved figure in the US indie rock scene, has died aged 58 following a heart attack. The news was confirmed by his manager Jeff Tartakov. Numerous cultural figures have paid tribute to the cult songwriter once a favourite of Kurt Cobain including Beck, Judd Apatow and Ezra Furman, who described him as one of my best teachers. Actor Elijah Wood wrote: What a gentle, beautiful treasure. So sad to hear youve left us. Born in California in 1961 and raised in West Virginia, Johnston became known as a songwriter after moving to Austin, Texas. His popularity grew …

Why The Third Man is an essential primer for no-deal Brexit

As the classic noir gets a 70th anniversary re-release, its hard to ignore the parallels between a shattered postwar Vienna teeming with spivs and the future the Brexiters have in mind What perfect timing for The Third Man to step back out of the shadows. Often hailed as the finest film Britain ever made, a 70th anniversary re-release will see it return to cinemas with the government much in the market for symbols of national grandeur. While Boris Johnson has named his favourite film as Dodgeball for once, eerily believable as the great British breakdown goes on it is easy to imagine him waving a tiny Union Jack at Carol Reeds majestic noir. It is true, of course, that there …

Why dont doctors trust women? Because they dont know much about us | Gabrielle Jackson

The medical community have known for a century that women are living in constant pain. Theyve done nothing about it Its frustrating to have questions that dont get answered. Its altogether disturbing to find out that those questions havent even been asked. When I was diagnosed with endometriosis at age 23, I didnt know enough to ask the right questions. I assumed my gynaecologist had all the answers, and listened carefully to his thoughtful explanations. I thought I knew it all. Or at least that he knew it all. But I was wrong. It was only after more than a decade of feeling weak, second-rate, wimpy and affect at least 50 million US women alone. I discovered that some of …

My daughter was raised during the siege of Aleppo. I had to make a film for her

For Sama, a new documentary from award winning Syrian journalist Waad al-Kateab has won global acclaim The camera focuses on Samas face. She is the sweetest baby and looks, at first glance, as though her life might be ordinary. Her eyes are a transitory newborn colour, greyish green, waiting to turn brown. Her gold earrings look over-large in her tiny ears. Sama means sky in Arabic a sky, as her mother imagines it, where no bombs fall, with ordinary clouds and sunshine. So far, this is footage that could be the work of any doting parent, but Samas mother is journalist Waad al-Kateab and this is her documentary For Sama, filmed during the Syrian war. In the film al-Kateab sings …

James Acaster: Adulthood is still a bit daunting

When the comics life fell apart, he sought solace in the music of 2016. He discusses the songs that saved his life Cold Lasagne Hate Myself 1999, and a run of acclaimed Netflix specials, Acaster had an annus horribilis in 2017. Over 12 months, he broke up with his girlfriend, parted ways with his agent, and his mental health suffered, all while the world seemed to be imploding with Trump, Perfect Sound Whatever, out now, is the tale of Acasters new record collection, his personal challenges, and how he made it through to the other side. Here he selects five songs that saved his life, from skittish Japanese electronica to yodelling. Music to make you love or laugh. Jeff RosenstockPerfect …

JD Salinger estate finally agrees to ebook editions

Authors son explains that wish for accessibility has persuaded trustees to look past his fathers dislike of digital media After years of refusing to allow publishers to digitise his works, the estate of JD Salinger has announced that the authors famously small body of work will be published as ebooks for the first time. Salingers son Matt said that the author had always valued accessibility, but preferred the experience of reading a physical book. The Catcher in the Rye author, who died in 2010 at the age of 91, also hated the internet; Matt And in 2009, Fahrenheit 451 author Ray Bradbury told the New York Times: They wanted to put a book of mine on Yahoo! You know what …

Want to Know the Real Future of AR/VR? Ask Their Devs

If you want to get a rosy view of the future of virtual and augmented reality, ask a company that works in the space. If you want to get a pessimistic view, ask an investor. But if you want a realistic view, one shaped by experience instead of conjecture and wishful thinking, ask the folks who are actually making the stuff. From their perspective, according to a new report from the organizers of the annual conference XRDC, things aren't looking bad at all. Reports like these aren't uncommon, but they're usually published by analyst firms who conduct research by talking to companies. Instead, XRDC's "AR/VR Innovation Report" was generated from an online survey of more than 900 developers. "Our main …

The culture cure: how prescription art is lifting people out of depression| Helen Russell

From singing in a group to being read to in a library, participation in the arts is having amazing results among a pilot group, says journalist Helen Russell In a whitewashed studio in northern Denmark, 11 unemployed strangers are embarking on a hearty rendition of Yellow Submarine. Jonas Thryse is not one of them. At least, not yet. The 36-year-old has agoraphobia, rarely leaves the house and cant think of anything worse than a group singalong. And yet by the second chorus he is putty in the choirmasters hands. I swore Id just stand at the back and listen, he says. But the mood was infectious. Out of work and in his second year of sick leave because of anxiety …

House of pain: who are the Sacklers under fire in lawsuits over opioids?

The Sackler name graced some of the worlds top museums and universities. But now key family members are being sued over the US opioid crisis and their wealth and reputation are under threat Eight members of the billionaire that eight people in a single family made the choices that caused much of the US deadly, deceptive illegal scheme. The family have long been lauded in philanthropy circles, and the Sackler name adorns top British and American museums, galleries and universities. But now their narcotics fortune, chiefly distributed via family foundations and trusts, is being growing number of people, and despite strenuous denials of wrongdoing, their reputations and vast wealth are under threat. They are responsible for addiction, overdose and death …

Art Neville, New Orleans funk star, dies aged 81

Keyboardist and singer behind the Meters and the Neville Brothers hailed as an icon by Louisiana governor John Edwards Art Neville, one of the most celebrated funk musicians in the US, has died aged 81. His manager, Kent Sorrell, confirmed that the keyboardist and vocalist passed away peacefully this morning at home, with his adoring wife, Lorraine, by his side. No cause of death has been given, but his health had declined in recent years. He had suffered a stroke as well as complications from back surgery in 2001. Born in 1937, Neville grew up in New Orleans. His career began in the mid-50s when he joined the band the Hawketts, which he went on to front. Their song Mardi …

The #IceBae Meme Captures the Worst of 2019 So Far

IceBae is not the frozen water equivalent of Salt Bae, sending ice cubes cascading stylishly into cups across the internet. She's a US Customs and Border Protection officer, identified as Kiara Cervantes, who provided security during Vice President Mike Pence's recent visit to a Texas Immigration and Customs Enforcement detention center. On Sunday, a Twitter user encountered a photo of Cervantes standing in front of a crowded pen of migrants. This user found the image sexy, and shared it. Other users followed suit, and soon #IceBae—the most 2019 of thirst hashtags—was born. Emma Grey Ellis Stop Meme-ing Taylor Swift Emma Grey Ellis The Meaning Behind the #UnwantedIvanka Meme Emma Grey Ellis Why the Momo Challenge Film Might Beat the Meme …

Reddits Manosphere and the Challenge of Quantifying Hate

Away from the main thoroughfares of r/Showerthoughts and r/mildlyinteresting, far from the light of r/aww, there is Reddit’s “manosphere.” It’s a confederacy of men’s rights subreddits, so named because it’s a place where women are unwelcome. Manosphere members might think of themselves as “involuntarily celibate,” like the man who drove a van into Toronto pedestrians last year, or something more empowered and oblique, like “men going their own way.” In either mode, they are united by their belief that modern men aren’t getting their due, and the usurpers, in their eyes, are women. Though the communities themselves tend to be relatively small—even big ones have only about 100,000 members—their impact is felt across the web. They incubate predator trolls, they …

In Defense of Mayonnaise

Mayonnaise is the internet’s favorite condiment villain. The egg, oil, and vinegar emulsion is a symbol not only for blandness, but for whiteness and all its attendant cultural appropriation and entitlement. It symbolizes the whitewashing of culture. It looks like something extruded from a teenage pimple or a long festering wound. Plus, haters love to point out, it’s terrible for you. It’s all fat! And salt! And because of the eggs, it's dangerous! If you leave a potato salad made with it out too long at your BBQ, everyone could get salmonella and then you're literally a murderer. Do you really love mayonnaise enough to murder a Fourth of July party for it? Yes, I do. And it's worse than …

The 140-tonne, fire-breathing crane: inside Glastonbury’s hottest attraction

Powered by chip fat, this enormous crane rescued from Bristol docks is about to become the festivals dance hotspot. We have no idea if it will work, say the duo behind it The idea, says Pip Rush, is to take over the sky. Were standing on a 140-tonne crane, 30 metres above the Glastonbury festival site. Rush and his collaborator Bert Cole are sanguine as they take in the view, but Im clutching the railings, summer breeze blowing through the jasmine of my freaking mind. From its birth in 1975 until it was rendered obsolete by bigger kit, this crane lifted loads at Avonmouth Docks in Bristol. Rush and Cole bought it for an undisclosed sum, chopped it into two …

Change Your Life: Bestride the Bidet

This story is part of a series on how we clean—from organizing your house to arranging your photos. As you read this, there is poop in your butt. I don’t mean whatever’s cooking in your colon. I mean you missed a spot, right there, near the exit, at the perianal surface: residual stool. Not a shit-ton, if you’re average. About 0.14 grams, the CDC estimates—enough to stain the inside of your undies or, multiplied by a neighborhood’s worth of sticky fourth graders, to put the poo in public pool. It may cause rectal sores. It may reveal itself, sniff sniff, during the act of love. It seems to bother only the barest minimum of the American poopulace, most of whom …