Why The Third Man is an essential primer for no-deal Brexit

As the classic noir gets a 70th anniversary re-release, its hard to ignore the parallels between a shattered postwar Vienna teeming with spivs and the future the Brexiters have in mind What perfect timing for The Third Man to step back out of the shadows. Often hailed as the finest film Britain ever made, a 70th anniversary re-release will see it return to cinemas with the government much in the market for symbols of national grandeur. While Boris Johnson has named his favourite film as Dodgeball for once, eerily believable as the great British breakdown goes on it is easy to imagine him waving a tiny Union Jack at Carol Reeds majestic noir. It is true, of course, that there …

Why dont doctors trust women? Because they dont know much about us | Gabrielle Jackson

The medical community have known for a century that women are living in constant pain. Theyve done nothing about it Its frustrating to have questions that dont get answered. Its altogether disturbing to find out that those questions havent even been asked. When I was diagnosed with endometriosis at age 23, I didnt know enough to ask the right questions. I assumed my gynaecologist had all the answers, and listened carefully to his thoughtful explanations. I thought I knew it all. Or at least that he knew it all. But I was wrong. It was only after more than a decade of feeling weak, second-rate, wimpy and affect at least 50 million US women alone. I discovered that some of …

James Acaster: Adulthood is still a bit daunting

When the comics life fell apart, he sought solace in the music of 2016. He discusses the songs that saved his life Cold Lasagne Hate Myself 1999, and a run of acclaimed Netflix specials, Acaster had an annus horribilis in 2017. Over 12 months, he broke up with his girlfriend, parted ways with his agent, and his mental health suffered, all while the world seemed to be imploding with Trump, Perfect Sound Whatever, out now, is the tale of Acasters new record collection, his personal challenges, and how he made it through to the other side. Here he selects five songs that saved his life, from skittish Japanese electronica to yodelling. Music to make you love or laugh. Jeff RosenstockPerfect …

JD Salinger estate finally agrees to ebook editions

Authors son explains that wish for accessibility has persuaded trustees to look past his fathers dislike of digital media After years of refusing to allow publishers to digitise his works, the estate of JD Salinger has announced that the authors famously small body of work will be published as ebooks for the first time. Salingers son Matt said that the author had always valued accessibility, but preferred the experience of reading a physical book. The Catcher in the Rye author, who died in 2010 at the age of 91, also hated the internet; Matt And in 2009, Fahrenheit 451 author Ray Bradbury told the New York Times: They wanted to put a book of mine on Yahoo! You know what …

Siege: Trump under Fire by Michael Wolff review

Michael Wolffs second bite at the Trump presidency speculates on how the fiasco will end The Trump presidency began as Kim Jong-un, Michael Wolffs siege of Mafeking, let alone that of Leningrad. The war of attrition waged by Wolff and his fellow journalists has hardly worn Trump down; he retains the freedom of the air, tweeting out a daily barrage of lies and insults and jetting off to stoke up bigots in midwestern arenas or embarrass foreign heads of state who wince as they welcome him on to their soil. Mostly Siege retells scandalous stories that are pretty familiar, with few fresh disclosures. Despite the indiscreet tattle dribbled into his ear by the disgruntled Melania in hospital for a week …

Danielle Steel is a prolific writer, but is that to be envied? | Oliver Burkeman

Working all the time, shes written 179 books. But compulsive productivity has a flip side The novelist Danielle Steel has written 179 books, releasing them at the rate of seven a year and for all I know, shell have released a few more in the days between my writing this column and you reading it. But how? In an she works all the time. No, I mean, all the time: for at least 20 hours a day, with a full 24-hour day a few times a month, and one weeks holiday per year. I know the question youre about to ask, and the answer is: like Margaret Thatcher. I dont get to bed until Im so tired I could sleep …