UK ‘not acting fast enough’ on climate change

She also aspired to the UK hosting a hugely important global climate summit next year. But the CCC said that the UK was already stumbling over measures needed to achieve the previous target of an 80% emissions cut. Its report says new policies must be found to help people lead good lives without fuelling global warming. Policies are needed to ensure that people living in care homes, hospitals and flats can stay cool in increasingly hot summers. And ministers must show how funds will be found to protect critical infrastructure – like ports – from rising sea levels. The committee said unless it delivered on these issues, the government would not have the credibility to host a global climate change …

Train killer ‘would panic on rail journeys’

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Mitchell lived with Pencille at her flat in Farnham When she was questioned in court about why, on the day of the killing, it apparently took her more than nine hours to work out what her boyfriend had done, Mitchell said: “I’m a bit slow.” “If someone tells a joke, I don’t pick up on it until five minutes later,” she explained. In the hours after the killing, as Mr Pomeroy’s teenage son and other traumatised passengers were supported by the police, on-the-run Pencille had called Mitchell to collect him and take him to their Farnham home, about 15 miles from the scene of the stabbing. He discarded clothing and took a shower. By …

‘Why I gave my kidney to a stranger’

Image copyright Bev Bradbury Jones Image caption Bev only knows the person who received her kidney was very ill Bev, 48, from Cwmbran, became an altruistic kidney donor in April “I signed up to become a bone marrow donor last year and was sent a flyer about becoming a kidney donor – I read it and thought why not? “I am an impulsive person and I will admit I didn’t tell my family straight away. “My husband Paul and daughter Cassie were apprehensive but they knew there was no stopping me. “The process took a year and the doctors tested everything they could, so I had a full MOT. “I had the operation in April and I was in hospital …

Staff ‘threatened’ at Belfast leisure centre

The fires mark William of Orange’s victory over the Catholic King James II at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690 and supporters say they are an important part of loyalist culture. Image copyright Gary McKeown Image caption Avoniel Leisure Centre closed early on Sunday due to the “potential threat to staff” In its note to councillors, the council said the matter would be reviewed on Monday morning and it would remain in contact with police. The Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) said it would make inquiries. The Alliance Party leader Naomi Long said the situation was “absolutely disgraceful”. “The community should not be deprived of facilities because of thuggery,” added the MEP, who is based in east Belfast. …

Summer dilemma: Can you wear flip-flops to work?

“What we wear is very much a part of our identity,” Ms Mair says. “It’s a way of saying: ‘We expect you to behave in a certain way.’” But dress codes can be seen as a form of social control, she says. “The idea is to create uniform behaviour, as well as a uniform look.” Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Employers must be careful about sexual discrimination when they dictate dress codes What employers need to be particularly careful about is relaxing dress codes for women in warm weather and not for men, she adds. “If [male] employees in customer-facing roles have to wear a suit, a tie, and a long-sleeved shirt”, while women can “wear summer dresses and …

Health trust apologises for ‘serious failings’

‘Limited chances’ She said the patient’s limited chances of survival from her illness, liver disease, were dependent on her receiving timely and appropriate care. In a statement to BBC News NI, the NHSCT said the patient’s treatment had fallen short of the accepted standard. “We have apologised unreservedly to the family of the patient that the treatment and care she received fell short of the standard that we strive to achieve,” it said. “We have identified and taken on board the learning from this case and this will continue to be reflected in practice going forward.” Related Topics Coleraine NHS Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

Alcohol abuse ‘affects one in five’ UK inpatients

The study was published in the Addiction journal. It looked at 124 past studies to estimate how many patients had any of 26 conditions related to heavy alcohol use. These included: liver disorders gastrointestinal disorders alcohol poisoning mental disorders because of alcohol use foetal alcohol syndrome The patients were in general wards, intensive care units, A&E departments or mental health inpatient units. ‘Much bigger problem’ The report’s lead author, Dr Emmert Roberts, said many doctors knew the problems were common among inpatients. But he warned: “Our results suggest the problem is much bigger than anecdotally assumed.” Alcohol abuse was most common among patients in mental health units, the report found. Dependence was more common among people in A&E departments. Dr …

4,500 jobs at risk as William Hill axes 700 stores

Which betting shops are affected? We don’t know yet. William Hill will not be revealing which stores will close until later this year. However, staff at the shops were told about the decision earlier this week. What are fixed-odds betting terminals? Gambling firms pledge £60m to help addicts The government cut the maximum stake on fixed-odds betting terminals (FOBTs), which had previously been £100, because of widespread concern that players were able to lose large amounts of money in a short space of time. These are electronic gaming machines that allow players to bet on the outcome of various simulated games and events, such as roulette, blackjack, bingo and horse races. In its annual report, published in March, William Hill …

Jess Glynne pulls out of TRNSMT on health grounds

Scottish singer Lewis Capaldi will step in as a special guest to fill their slot. Glynne released a statement saying her decision to pull out of TRNSMT “absolutely kills me”. She said she had been diagnosed with a vocal chord haemorrhage and would have to cancel all her shows up to 14 July. Related Topics Music festivals Glasgow Jess Glynne Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

Transgender hate crime rises by 81%

West Yorkshire Police and South Yorkshire Police saw reporting of transgender hate crimes more than treble over three years. Suffolk Constabulary and Merseyside Police were the only forces which recorded fewer crimes in 2018-19 than in 2016-17. Image caption West Yorkshire Police is currently running a campaign to help prevent hate crime Equal rights charity Stonewall estimated that two in five trans people had experienced a hate crime or incident in the past year. Andi Woolford, from Wakefield, West Yorkshire, works in social housing and was abused while she was sitting in her car. “A guy came out of a block of flats, called me a paedophile, threatened to stab me, smashed my car up, held a dog chain up …

Coming to a school near you? The four-and-a-half-day week

A number of UK schools have taken the decision to move to a shorter working week because of funding shortages – and nowhere more so, it would appear, than in Birmingham. More than 20 schools in the city now plan to save money by sending children home at Friday lunchtime. Emma Jane Kirby visited one to learn more about the financial pressures they face. It’s even more of a squash than usual in the Bellfield Junior School hall this morning and small, scuffed knees knock against each other as the children sit cross-legged on the herringbone parquet floor. For the first time in their academic life, year two infants have been given special dispensation to join junior assembly. Come the …

Immigration and schools focus of Tory race

“I do believe therefore that it is right to go for an Australian-style points-based system so that the needs of the UK economy can be properly met,” he said. “Yes, I do want talented people to be able to come here and yes I do want the agricultural sector to be able to satisfy their requirements as well, it’s incredibly important, but it’s got to be done on the basis of a system of democratic control.” Under Mr Hunt’s new proposal, anyone who creates a new business which employs more than 10 people for five years would have their university tuition fee debts written off. Mr Hunt, who has stressed his background as an entrepreneur, said he wanted to give …

Hundreds more cases in baby deaths review

The independent review, being led by midwife Donna Ockenden, was already investigating 250 cases. Latest news from the West Midlands It initially focused on 23 cases in which maternity failings were alleged. But by March, 250 families had come forward, although it is understood not all the cases related to death or serious harm. What do we know about the review? Baby death investigation ‘not watered down’ Temporary new boss for under-fire trust The trust, which was put into special measures in November, was also made subject to “further urgent action” in May amid safety concerns over emergency and maternity services, following an inspection by the Care Quality Commission (CQC). Analysis By BBC Social Affairs Correspondent Michael Buchanan NHS regulators …

The care home that built a replica High Street

Image caption The care home is also home to animals, including some hungry goats “It just got bigger and bigger and it was like, ‘Let’s do this, let’s not just have shop fronts but spaces people could actually use, that families could use,’” says Anthea Reid, the care home’s manager. Next to the cages housing the parrots there are guinea pigs, ducks and those hungry goats – all aimed at stimulating residents’ senses. Image caption Audrey, next to her daughter Viv, has lived at the home for two years “I think it’s excellent, it gives them a talking point,” says Viv Semmens, whose 90-year-old mum Audrey has lived there for two years. Audrey is living with dementia, like more than …

Call to end assessments for terminally ill

Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption‘You have to prove you’re terminally ill – even when there’s medical evidence’ The family of a woman who died from motor neurone disease is calling for an end to a disability benefit assessments for the terminally ill. Susan Hill was 63 when she died, 18 months after she was diagnosed. She had applied for personal independence payment (PIP) to pay for carers and underwent what her husband called a “quite degrading” assessment. The Department for Work and Pensions said it is looking into how it can improve its processes. Motor neurone disease (MND) is a degenerative condition which can leave patients without the ability to speak, move or eat. Image caption …