Scientists Save a Sick Teen, Hackers Steal $40 Million, and More News

Viruses from a freezer saved a dying teen, hackers stole millions, and Adam Savage has some organization tips for you. Here's what you should know, in two minutes or less. Today's Headlines Genetically tweaked viruses just saved a sick teen A teenage girl in London found herself in life-threatening peril from cystic fibrosis, a genetic condition where the lungs can’t clear mucus or disease-causing bacteria. She had already had double lung transplants and was running out of options. So her doctors turned to scientists at the University of Pittsburgh, where the world's largest collection of bacteriophages—viruses that prey solely on bacteria—was stored in freezers. Scientists identified phages that could attack the bacteria assaulting the patient, and now she is slowly …

Sunscreen in Your Bloodstream, Googles Conference, and More News

Sunscreen chemicals are slipping through your pores, Google has big conference coming, and Game of Thrones made an "oopsie." Here's the news you need to know, in two minutes or less. PSA: Sunscreen chemicals can seep into your bloodstream A new clinical trial from the FDA suggests that, contrary to what sunscreen manufacturers have been saying, the UV blocking chemicals in sunscreen do, in fact, seep into your bloodstream. Don't toss those tubes just yet though; thus far there isn't any evidence that anything harmful is happening because of it. What to expect from Google's big conference tomorrow Google's I/O conference is tomorrow. You can watch it on wired.com, but before you do, read our rundown of what we expect …

Elon’s Court-Approved Twitter-Sitter, Measles in LA, and More News

The dust has finally settled on Tesla CEO Elon Musk's battle with the SEC, LA is under quarantine, and the US is falling behind in SIM-swap hacking. Here's the news you need to know in two minutes or less. Elon Musk is getting a stricter Twitter-sitter Musk and the SEC have reached a settlement in their court clash over his tweets. The Twitter kerfuffle stems from an incident when the agency asked a federal judge to hold Musk in contempt of court for violating an agreement that a Tesla lawyer would pre-approve all of his written communications—including tweets. Now, Musk and the SEC set stricter and more specific terms for Musk’s official Twitter babysitter, namely that it would be “an …

Game of Thrones Returns, a New Star Wars Trailer, and More

Tech news you can use, in two minutes or less: Winter is coming It's true: The final season of Game of Thrones begins this Sunday. We collected the biggest GoT fans in the office to chat about their hopes and dreams for the future of Westeros. Haven't caught up on the show? We recommend binge-watching it backward. Disney+ is ready to take over the world Disney's long-discussed streaming service, Disney+, will launch November 12. What's the deal, you ask? It will be $6.99 a month, have movies from Disney, Marvel, Pixar, and all of Star Wars (!), as well as a compliment of TV shows from Disney, National Geographic, and Fox. If you live in a house with kids, good …

Alexa, What’s My Blood-Sugar Level?

Amazon may be known as the “everything store,” but the company’s tendrils extend far beyond ecommerce. On Thursday, Amazon said Alexa-enabled devices can now handle customers’ sensitive medical data, and it teased the release of a new kit that would allow approved outside developers to build Alexa skills that access users’ private health information, paving the way for the voice assistant to play a bigger role in health care. With the announcement came the release of new skills giving Alexa the ability to relay and store blood sugar measurements from internet-connected monitoring devices, help schedule doctors’ appointments, pass on post-op instructions from hospitals, and provide prescription delivery updates by securely accessing customers’ private medical information. As part of the announcement, …

5Gs Potential Health Hazard, Zucks Deleted Posts, and More News

Tech news you can use, in two minutes or less: 5G: Cool for your cellphone, terrible for your health? 5G, the cell phone network that promises to exponentially increase data speeds for all, might help load a web page faster but could also hurt your health. It turns out your sweat glands act kind of like antennas in response to the high frequency waves planned to be used in the service, and funding for research on the health effects is relatively slim. 5G is still in its infancy in the US though, so here's to hoping research about its potential health hazards catch up with the technology itself. Facebook had a hell of a weekend Over the weekend, Facebook poked …

Inside Airbnbs Guerrilla War Against Local Governments

"Read my lips: We want to pay taxes,” Chris Lehane, Airbnb’s global head of public policy, told the nation’s mayors in 2016. In the years since, the home-sharing site has repeated the declaration in press releases, op-eds, emails, and on billboards. On its website, Airbnb says it is “democratizing revenue by generating tens of millions of new tax dollars for governments all over the world.” But when Palm Beach County, Florida, a popular tourist destination, passed an ordinance in October 2018 requiring Airbnb and other short-term rental companies to collect and pay the county’s 6 percent occupancy tax on visits arranged through their sites, Airbnb sued. Palm Beach County tax collector Anne Gannon wasn’t surprised. “We knew we were going …

Polio Is Nearly Wiped OutUnless Some Lab Tech Screws Up

In 1979, a photographer named Janet Parker got a disease that wasn't supposed to exist anymore. At first she thought she had the flu, but then she kept getting sicker, got a rash, and went to the hospital, where doctors—in disbelief—diagnosed her with smallpox. Just a year earlier, the World Health Organization had declared that "mankind probably had seen its last case of smallpox," according to The New York Times. That should have been true. But in a Birmingham University lab below Parker's darkroom, a scientist had been working furiously to finish up his viral research, before officials clamped down on the number of facilities studying the nearly dead disease. The scientist wasn't obeying safety protocols, and the virus escaped …