Most Americans think the U.S. is at its lowest point in history

The current state of affairs in the United States has Americans really stressed out. 

A new poll by the American Psychological Association found that 63 percent of Americans are stressed about the future of the United States, and 59 percent of Americans think it is currently the lowest point in the nation’s history.

The poll found that, essentially, most Americans are wringing their hands and grinding their teeth with the way the country is currently headed.

Nearly two-thirds of Americans polled said the future of the country is a “very or somewhat significant” source of stress—more than money and work. Meanwhile, 59 percent of Americans said the country is at its lowest point in history that they’ve lived through–including World War II, the Cuban Missile Crisis, and the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

Specifically, 59 percent of Americans said the current social divisiveness causes stress, and a majority of adults from both major political parties said the country’s future was a source of stress. However, the feeling was higher among Democrats (73 percent) compared to Republicans (56 percent). Almost 60 percent of independent voters said they felt the same way.

“We’re seeing significant stress transcending party lines,” Arthur C. Evans Jr., PhD, the American Psychological Association’s chief executive officer, said in a statement. “The uncertainty and unpredictability tied to the future of our nation is affecting the health and well-being of many Americans in a way that feels unique to this period in recent history.”

The issues giving Americans stress, the poll found, are likely what you’d expect: 43 percent said healthcare, 35 percent said the economy, 32 percent said trust in the government, 31 percent said crime and hate crimes, 31 percent said wars with other countries, and 30 percent said terrorist attacks in the United States.

Unemployment and low wages (22 percent) and climate change (21 percent) also give Americans stress, the poll notes.

Current events are also a cause of stress, according to the poll. While 95 percent of adults said they follow the news regularly, more than half of them said it gives them stress. Two-thirds of those polled said the news often “blows things out of proportion.”

However, the stress has spurred some people into action. The poll found that around half of the country has volunteered in response to the state of the nation, and 28 percent have signed a petition.

The American Psychological Association surveyed 3,440 adults online from Aug. 2 to Aug. 31 to compile their results.

You can read more about the American Psychological Association’s poll here.

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