To the Moon and Back - Feed https://moonpixlar.pw Just news from around Mon, 12 Nov 2018 23:16:49 +0000 en-US https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.8 https://moonpixlar.pw/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/ama-news-logo-150x150.pngTo the Moon and Back – Just news from aroundhttps://moonpixlar.pw 32 32 104437631 Newspaper that posted video of NHL players ripping coach refuses to delete ithttps://moonpixlar.pw/newspaper-that-posted-video-of-nhl-players-ripping-coach-refuses-to-delete-it/ Mon, 12 Nov 2018 23:15:42 +0000 https://moonpixlar.pw/?p=6537
Ottawa Senators center Matt Duchene was among the players seen in a video ripping an assistant coach. The players apologized Monday. (Associated Press)

The Canadian newspaper that published a video of Ottawa Senators hockey players ripping their assistant coach during an Uber ride last month refused to remove the footage from its website.

Michelle Richardson, editor-in-chief of the Ottawa Citizen and Ottawa Sun, disputed the Senators’ claims that the publication of the video was of “no public interest” and violated the players’ rights.

“The public interest in the Senators as an organization extends beyond the team’s performance on the ice,” Richardson said in a statement published in the Ottawa Citizen. “The organization is involved in one of the biggest development projects in Ottawa’s history, a project that hinges on the Senators being here to play in a downtown arena.

“On-ice performance, ticket sales, attendance, discord in the locker room and public support of the organization are all relevant when it comes to discussing the overall health of the team,” she added.

Video shows several Senators players, including Chris Wideman, Matt Duchene, Chris Tierney, Thomas Chabot, Dylan DeMelo, Alex Formenton and Colin White, ripping assistant coach Martin Raymond. The conversation was caught on camera from an Uber driver in Arizona on Oct. 29. The video was published on the Ottawa Citizen’s YouTube page Monday.

WARNING: GRAPHIC LANGUAGE

Meanwhile, the Uber driver who posted the video, a father of six who has since been fired, called the upload "the dumbest decision" of his life, the Citizen reported.

James Sparklin told the newspaper that he only wanted to show his fellow drivers how highly paid athletes behave.

“You get a bunch of guys together and they’ll typically be guys,” he told the paper.

He also said he was concerned that transporting numerous highly paid players posed a financial risk to him if they were to become involved in an accident.

"I don’t believe the insurance would cover it," he said. "The million-dollar policy would go very fast."

Although the video was shot in Arizona, Uber Canada’s General Manager Rob Khazzam said that filming riders in his country without their consent was a violation of their terms of service.

“Filming or recording passengers without their consent is totally unacceptable and if reported/detected we will investigate,” he said.

Canadian law limits the disclosure of a person’s “personal information,” including name, age, income, personal opinions and social status among other provisions, according to the Washington Post. The province of Ontario has similar legislation.

The Canadian government can also restrict speech over national security concerns among other reasons, the Post reported, citing information from Freedom House. The democracy watchdog says Canada has an 18 out of 100 freedom of the press score with 0 being the freest and 100 being the least free.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

=>
***********************************************
Post Source Here: Newspaper that posted video of NHL players ripping coach refuses to delete it
************************************
=>

]]>
Ottawa Senators center Matt Duchene was among the players seen in a video ripping an assistant coach. The players apologized Monday. (Associated Press)

The Canadian newspaper that published a video of Ottawa Senators hockey players ripping their assistant coach during an Uber ride last month refused to remove the footage from its website.

Michelle Richardson, editor-in-chief of the Ottawa Citizen and Ottawa Sun, disputed the Senators’ claims that the publication of the video was of “no public interest” and violated the players’ rights.

“The public interest in the Senators as an organization extends beyond the team’s performance on the ice,” Richardson said in a statement published in the Ottawa Citizen. “The organization is involved in one of the biggest development projects in Ottawa’s history, a project that hinges on the Senators being here to play in a downtown arena.

“On-ice performance, ticket sales, attendance, discord in the locker room and public support of the organization are all relevant when it comes to discussing the overall health of the team,” she added.

Video shows several Senators players, including Chris Wideman, Matt Duchene, Chris Tierney, Thomas Chabot, Dylan DeMelo, Alex Formenton and Colin White, ripping assistant coach Martin Raymond. The conversation was caught on camera from an Uber driver in Arizona on Oct. 29. The video was published on the Ottawa Citizen’s YouTube page Monday.

WARNING: GRAPHIC LANGUAGE

Meanwhile, the Uber driver who posted the video, a father of six who has since been fired, called the upload "the dumbest decision" of his life, the Citizen reported.

James Sparklin told the newspaper that he only wanted to show his fellow drivers how highly paid athletes behave.

“You get a bunch of guys together and they’ll typically be guys,” he told the paper.

He also said he was concerned that transporting numerous highly paid players posed a financial risk to him if they were to become involved in an accident.

"I don’t believe the insurance would cover it," he said. "The million-dollar policy would go very fast."

Although the video was shot in Arizona, Uber Canada’s General Manager Rob Khazzam said that filming riders in his country without their consent was a violation of their terms of service.

“Filming or recording passengers without their consent is totally unacceptable and if reported/detected we will investigate,” he said.

Canadian law limits the disclosure of a person’s “personal information,” including name, age, income, personal opinions and social status among other provisions, according to the Washington Post. The province of Ontario has similar legislation.

The Canadian government can also restrict speech over national security concerns among other reasons, the Post reported, citing information from Freedom House. The democracy watchdog says Canada has an 18 out of 100 freedom of the press score with 0 being the freest and 100 being the least free.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

=>
***********************************************
Post Source Here: Newspaper that posted video of NHL players ripping coach refuses to delete it
************************************
=>

]]>
6537
Exit polls: This election is about Donald Trumphttps://moonpixlar.pw/exit-polls-this-election-is-about-donald-trump/ Mon, 12 Nov 2018 18:43:36 +0000 https://moonpixlar.pw/?p=6534

Who abandoned the incumbent Democratic senators in Indiana and Florida?

Republicans will keep control of the US Senate in large part because Democratic incumbents running in states won by President Donald Trump lost support among key groups that have backed the President. And this helped cost senators like Indiana's Joe Donnelly their jobs. Donnelly succumbed on Tuesday to Republican challenger Mike Braun.
Compared to his first election in 2012, Donnelly lost the backing of men, those without college degrees and those making less than $50,000, in particular, according to preliminary results from CNN's national exit poll.
Donnelly saw his support among men slide 6 percentage points. He also saw a slide of 12 percentage points among those without college degrees and 11 percentage points among those making less than $50,000.
    Indiana voters skewed red this year, with more approving of President Donald Trump than the general electorate.
    Meanwhile, in Florida, Sen. Bill Nelson, another incumbent Democrat, was trailing challenger Republican Rick Scott and the race remained tight hours after polls closed. Regardless of the end-result, tonight's performance is a far different story for Nelson than 2012, when he won more than 55% of the vote.
    Compared to 2012, Nelson's backing among those over age 45 dropped 7 percentage points. It dropped 9 percentage points among men, 7 percentage points among whites and 8 percentage points among those without college degrees.
    Just over a majority of Florida voters approved of Trump, more than the electorate as a whole.

    Young voters support the Democratic candidate in higher numbers than last midterm

    Preliminary CNN exit polls show voters between the ages of 18-29 reported supporting a Democratic candidate in the race for the House in higher numbers than in 2014. In the last midterm election, 54% of 18-29-year-olds voted Democratic while more than two-thirds said they voted for the Democrat so far in 2018.
    While all age groups have supported a Democratic candidate in higher numbers than the previous midterm election, according to the early exit polling, the jump among the youngest voters is around 14 percentage points while those in other age groups moved up less than 10 percentage points.
    9:24 p.m. ET / Grace Sparks

    Most say Russia investigation is politically motivated

    Slightly over half of voters in the 2018 election said that the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election is politically motivated, according to preliminary results from CNN's national exit poll. Around 40% said that it's a justified investigation. President Donald Trump often refers to the investigation as a smear campaign and "witch hunt."
    Around the same number who think the investigation is justified, about 40%, approve of the job Robert Mueller is doing handling the investigation, while slightly more disapprove of his job.
    8:14 p.m. ET / Grace Sparks

    Americans more worried about voters being blocked from casting ballots

    President Donald Trump has repeatedly raised the specter of voter fraud, warning as recently as Monday that law enforcement will be watching closely for any illegal voting.
    "Law Enforcement has been strongly notified to watch closely for any ILLEGAL VOTING which may take place in Tuesday's Election (or Early Voting). Anyone caught will be subject to the Maximum Criminal Penalties allowed by law. Thank you!" Trump tweeted.
    That's not in step with what worries Americans, however. More than half of voters said they were more concerned that people who should be able to vote will be prevented from doing so, according to preliminary results from CNN's national exit poll.
    Just over a third said they were more concerned that people who shouldn't be able to vote will cast ballots.
    Precincts in a multitude of states extended hours today because of voting issues.
    When it comes to foreign interference, half of voters said they don't think the government has done enough to protect this election, while just over one-third said enough has been done.
    8:08 p.m. ET / Tami Luhby

    Voters didn't support Kavanaugh's appointment to the Supreme Court

    Almost half of voters opposed Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation to the Supreme Court, according to preliminary data from CNN's national exit polls. A little over 40% supported his appointment. Around half of men supported Kavanaugh's confirmation compared to fewer than 40% of women who voted in this election, a significant gender divide.
    On Roe v. Wade, two-thirds of 2018 voters said they would like to keep the landmark Supreme Court decision in place while only a quarter want it overturned. More than 80% said that sexual harassment is a very or somewhat serious problem in our country today and almost half said it's very serious.
    7:43 p.m. ET / Grace Sparks

    Higher support for Trump in some key states

    In Indiana, around half of voters approve of the job Trump is doing as President around the same as in Missouri, slightly higher than the nationwide average. Both states feature tight Senate races where Democrats are trying to hold on to seats in states Trump won in 2016.
    Voters in Indiana and Missouri are split between whether their vote for Senate was in support of the President, opposition, or whether Trump isn't a factor in their vote. Around a third in both states said that their Senate vote was in opposition to Trump while around three-in-ten said it was in support of him or Trump wasn't a factor.
    7:38 p.m. ET / Grace Sparks

    Mixed views of Trump's agenda

    The election was very much about President Donald Trump, as many voters cast their ballot specifically to oppose or support him. Similarly, reviews of his agenda and his accomplishments were mixed. About half of voters said that Trump's immigration policies are too tough, while around a third think they're just right and few, only about 15%, think he's not tough enough, according to preliminary results from CNN's national exit polls.
    The tax law passed by Republicans and touted by Trump hasn't had a lot of impact on American voters' personal finances, according to the poll. Close to half say they've seen no impact, while around three-in-10 said the law has helped and a quarter report the tax law has hurt them.
    For his trade policies, which include new tariffs imposed on foreign countries and an update to NAFTA, about a third say they've had no impact on the economy in their area, but about 30% said that his trade policies have hurt them. A quarter indicate that his trade policies have helped their area's economy.
    6:34 p.m. ET / Grace Sparks

    Extremist violence was a factor in many votes in 2018

    Around three-quarters said that extremist violence is an important factor in their vote for the US House in 2018, according to preliminary CNN exit data, with a quarter who said it's the most important factor and half who said it's an important factor. Few said that extremist violence is a minor or not a factor to their vote.
    Another three-quarters of 2018 voters said that Americans are becoming more divided politically. Fewer than one-in-10 think the country is becoming more united, and slightly more say the country is staying about the same.
    6:20 p.m. ET / Grace Sparks

    Voters want more women and racial minorities elected to public office

    Almost 80% of voters said that it's very or somewhat important that more women be elected to public office and almost half said it's very important. Slightly more women than men placed a priority on electing more women to public office, but not by much.
    Slightly fewer but around seven-in-ten said that it's very or somewhat important for racial and ethnic minorities to be elected to public office. Around two-thirds of white voters said it's important to elect more minorities while around 80% of African Americans agreed.
    6:17 p.m. ET / Grace Sparks

    Most voters, particularly Democratic voters, want major changes in health care

    It's no surprise that health care was the top issue for most voters. Roughly four in 10 voters listed it as their top concern, according to preliminary results from CNN's national exit poll.
    This was especially true amongDemocrats.
    What is more surprising is that roughly seven in 10 voters said they wanted major changes to the nation's health care system, with more Democrats feeling this way than Republicans. Among voters who felt that health care needs minor, more were Republicans. More Democrats wanted no changes.
    This is a huge swing from two years ago, when President Donald Trump and congressional Republicans saw their big wins at the polls as a mandate to repeal the Affordable Care Act. The effort ultimately failed, though the Trump administration continues to undermine the landmark health reform law through regulatory changes.
    This election, however, revolved around retaining Obamacare's key provisions that protect those with pre-existing conditions. Democratic candidates repeatedly attacked their Republican rivals as jeopardizing the health insurance of millions of Americans who are or have been sick. The popularity of these Obamacare protections forced Republican candidates to promise to uphold these measures.
    Many voters weren't convinced. More than half said Democrats would better protect health care for people with pre-existing conditions, while only one-third said Republicans would.
    6:03 p.m. ET / Tami Luhby
    Correction: This post has been updated to reflect it was more Republicans and not a majority of Republicans who support minor changes and more Democrats support no changes to the health care law.

    Nancy Pelosi more unpopular than Donald Trump

    The Democratic Party has slightly higher favorability than the Republican Party in preliminary data from CNN's national exit poll. About half of voters said they had a positive view of the Democratic Party, while the Republican Party is upside down, with slightly more than 40% saying they had a positive view of the Republicans.
    The downside for Democrats is an extremely low favorable rating for Nancy Pelosi, the woman who would like to again be Speaker of the House if Democrats win control of the House of Representatives. Only about three-in-10 voters had a positive view of Pelosi and more than half had an unfavorable view. In fact, more voters had an unfavorable view of Pelosi than had an unfavorable view of President Trump, according to preliminary results.
    -- 5:56 p.m. ET / Grace Sparks

    Most voters feel good or great about the economy

    President Donald Trump has repeatedly highlighted how good the economy is doing under his watch.
    Many voters agreed. More than two-thirds said the economy is excellent or good, though Republicans were much more likely to feel that way, according to preliminary results from CNN's national exit poll.
    Just under a third of voters said the economy is not good or poor, and bof them were Democrats.
    The economy, however, was not the key issue for many voters this midterm election. It ranked third, behind health care and immigration but well ahead of gun policy. The economy mattered more toRepublicans than Democrats.
    Nearly half of voters felt their financial situation is the same as it was two years ago. Just over a third said it was better, while a little less than 15% said it was worse.
    Republicans were initially running on the tax cut package they passed at the end of 2017, though that fervor faded as the midterms approached. Voters were more muted about the tax cuts' effect on their lives. Nearly half said it had no impact, while just under a quarter said it hurt them. Just over a quarter said they were helped by the tax cuts.
    -- 5:50 p.m. ET / Tami Luhby
    Correction: The percentage of Democrats saying the economy was not good or poor has been corrected.

    Voters decided a long time ago

    A big majority of voters, about two-thirds, made their 2018 election decision before the last month, according to preliminary exit poll results. Only one-in-five said they decided in the last month and even fewer said they made up their minds in the last few days or last week.
    About four-in-five have voted in a midterm election before, but about 15% said that this is the first time they've voted in a midterm. About 10% said they were first-time voters in the 2016 election.
    5:34 p.m. ET / Grace Sparks

    More voted opposing Trump than supporting him

    More than 40% of voters in the 2018 election approve of the job Trump is doing as President, according to the preliminary results from CNN's national exit poll. About three-in-10 said they strongly approve of Trump while almost half said they strongly disapprove of him.
    Almost two-thirds said that Trump was a factor in their vote for the House today. About a quarter said their vote was in support of the President and almost 40% said that their vote was in opposition to him.
    A majority, a little more than half, said things in the country are on the wrong track. About 40% say they're going in the right direction.
    5:20 p.m. ET / Grace Sparks

    This election is about Donald Trump

    Two-thirds of voters say their vote in today's congressional election is about Donald Trump, according to early exit polls, and more say they're showing up at the polls to express opposition than support for the President. The President's approval rating is net negative among the nation's voters, and more say things in the country are on the wrong track than that they are going in the right direction. Still, nearly 7 in 10 say the economy is in good shape, and those who say their personal finances are in better shape now than two years ago outnumber those who feel their finances have worsened.
    About 4 in 10 voters turning out to vote across the country choose health care as the most important problem facing the country, and more, 7 in 10, say the nation's health care system needs major changes. About 2 in 10 each choose the economy and immigration as their top issue, and 1 in 10 say it's gun policy.
    With a historically diverse slate of candidates on ballots nationwide, about half of voters say it's very important to them that more women are elected to public office and that more racial and ethnic minorities are elected.
    A sizeable 1 in 6 voters say this election is the first time they're casting a ballot in a midterm contest.
      -- 5 p.m. ET / Jennifer Agiesta
      These figures will change and be updated throughout the evening. Please check CNN's Election Center for the most updated data.

      Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

      =>
      ***********************************************
      Post Source Here: Exit polls: This election is about Donald Trump
      ************************************
      =>

      ]]>

      Who abandoned the incumbent Democratic senators in Indiana and Florida?

      Republicans will keep control of the US Senate in large part because Democratic incumbents running in states won by President Donald Trump lost support among key groups that have backed the President. And this helped cost senators like Indiana's Joe Donnelly their jobs. Donnelly succumbed on Tuesday to Republican challenger Mike Braun.
      Compared to his first election in 2012, Donnelly lost the backing of men, those without college degrees and those making less than $50,000, in particular, according to preliminary results from CNN's national exit poll.
      Donnelly saw his support among men slide 6 percentage points. He also saw a slide of 12 percentage points among those without college degrees and 11 percentage points among those making less than $50,000.
        Indiana voters skewed red this year, with more approving of President Donald Trump than the general electorate.
        Meanwhile, in Florida, Sen. Bill Nelson, another incumbent Democrat, was trailing challenger Republican Rick Scott and the race remained tight hours after polls closed. Regardless of the end-result, tonight's performance is a far different story for Nelson than 2012, when he won more than 55% of the vote.
        Compared to 2012, Nelson's backing among those over age 45 dropped 7 percentage points. It dropped 9 percentage points among men, 7 percentage points among whites and 8 percentage points among those without college degrees.
        Just over a majority of Florida voters approved of Trump, more than the electorate as a whole.

        Young voters support the Democratic candidate in higher numbers than last midterm

        Preliminary CNN exit polls show voters between the ages of 18-29 reported supporting a Democratic candidate in the race for the House in higher numbers than in 2014. In the last midterm election, 54% of 18-29-year-olds voted Democratic while more than two-thirds said they voted for the Democrat so far in 2018.
        While all age groups have supported a Democratic candidate in higher numbers than the previous midterm election, according to the early exit polling, the jump among the youngest voters is around 14 percentage points while those in other age groups moved up less than 10 percentage points.
        9:24 p.m. ET / Grace Sparks

        Most say Russia investigation is politically motivated

        Slightly over half of voters in the 2018 election said that the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election is politically motivated, according to preliminary results from CNN's national exit poll. Around 40% said that it's a justified investigation. President Donald Trump often refers to the investigation as a smear campaign and "witch hunt."
        Around the same number who think the investigation is justified, about 40%, approve of the job Robert Mueller is doing handling the investigation, while slightly more disapprove of his job.
        8:14 p.m. ET / Grace Sparks

        Americans more worried about voters being blocked from casting ballots

        President Donald Trump has repeatedly raised the specter of voter fraud, warning as recently as Monday that law enforcement will be watching closely for any illegal voting.
        "Law Enforcement has been strongly notified to watch closely for any ILLEGAL VOTING which may take place in Tuesday's Election (or Early Voting). Anyone caught will be subject to the Maximum Criminal Penalties allowed by law. Thank you!" Trump tweeted.
        That's not in step with what worries Americans, however. More than half of voters said they were more concerned that people who should be able to vote will be prevented from doing so, according to preliminary results from CNN's national exit poll.
        Just over a third said they were more concerned that people who shouldn't be able to vote will cast ballots.
        Precincts in a multitude of states extended hours today because of voting issues.
        When it comes to foreign interference, half of voters said they don't think the government has done enough to protect this election, while just over one-third said enough has been done.
        8:08 p.m. ET / Tami Luhby

        Voters didn't support Kavanaugh's appointment to the Supreme Court

        Almost half of voters opposed Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation to the Supreme Court, according to preliminary data from CNN's national exit polls. A little over 40% supported his appointment. Around half of men supported Kavanaugh's confirmation compared to fewer than 40% of women who voted in this election, a significant gender divide.
        On Roe v. Wade, two-thirds of 2018 voters said they would like to keep the landmark Supreme Court decision in place while only a quarter want it overturned. More than 80% said that sexual harassment is a very or somewhat serious problem in our country today and almost half said it's very serious.
        7:43 p.m. ET / Grace Sparks

        Higher support for Trump in some key states

        In Indiana, around half of voters approve of the job Trump is doing as President around the same as in Missouri, slightly higher than the nationwide average. Both states feature tight Senate races where Democrats are trying to hold on to seats in states Trump won in 2016.
        Voters in Indiana and Missouri are split between whether their vote for Senate was in support of the President, opposition, or whether Trump isn't a factor in their vote. Around a third in both states said that their Senate vote was in opposition to Trump while around three-in-ten said it was in support of him or Trump wasn't a factor.
        7:38 p.m. ET / Grace Sparks

        Mixed views of Trump's agenda

        The election was very much about President Donald Trump, as many voters cast their ballot specifically to oppose or support him. Similarly, reviews of his agenda and his accomplishments were mixed. About half of voters said that Trump's immigration policies are too tough, while around a third think they're just right and few, only about 15%, think he's not tough enough, according to preliminary results from CNN's national exit polls.
        The tax law passed by Republicans and touted by Trump hasn't had a lot of impact on American voters' personal finances, according to the poll. Close to half say they've seen no impact, while around three-in-10 said the law has helped and a quarter report the tax law has hurt them.
        For his trade policies, which include new tariffs imposed on foreign countries and an update to NAFTA, about a third say they've had no impact on the economy in their area, but about 30% said that his trade policies have hurt them. A quarter indicate that his trade policies have helped their area's economy.
        6:34 p.m. ET / Grace Sparks

        Extremist violence was a factor in many votes in 2018

        Around three-quarters said that extremist violence is an important factor in their vote for the US House in 2018, according to preliminary CNN exit data, with a quarter who said it's the most important factor and half who said it's an important factor. Few said that extremist violence is a minor or not a factor to their vote.
        Another three-quarters of 2018 voters said that Americans are becoming more divided politically. Fewer than one-in-10 think the country is becoming more united, and slightly more say the country is staying about the same.
        6:20 p.m. ET / Grace Sparks

        Voters want more women and racial minorities elected to public office

        Almost 80% of voters said that it's very or somewhat important that more women be elected to public office and almost half said it's very important. Slightly more women than men placed a priority on electing more women to public office, but not by much.
        Slightly fewer but around seven-in-ten said that it's very or somewhat important for racial and ethnic minorities to be elected to public office. Around two-thirds of white voters said it's important to elect more minorities while around 80% of African Americans agreed.
        6:17 p.m. ET / Grace Sparks

        Most voters, particularly Democratic voters, want major changes in health care

        It's no surprise that health care was the top issue for most voters. Roughly four in 10 voters listed it as their top concern, according to preliminary results from CNN's national exit poll.
        This was especially true amongDemocrats.
        What is more surprising is that roughly seven in 10 voters said they wanted major changes to the nation's health care system, with more Democrats feeling this way than Republicans. Among voters who felt that health care needs minor, more were Republicans. More Democrats wanted no changes.
        This is a huge swing from two years ago, when President Donald Trump and congressional Republicans saw their big wins at the polls as a mandate to repeal the Affordable Care Act. The effort ultimately failed, though the Trump administration continues to undermine the landmark health reform law through regulatory changes.
        This election, however, revolved around retaining Obamacare's key provisions that protect those with pre-existing conditions. Democratic candidates repeatedly attacked their Republican rivals as jeopardizing the health insurance of millions of Americans who are or have been sick. The popularity of these Obamacare protections forced Republican candidates to promise to uphold these measures.
        Many voters weren't convinced. More than half said Democrats would better protect health care for people with pre-existing conditions, while only one-third said Republicans would.
        6:03 p.m. ET / Tami Luhby
        Correction: This post has been updated to reflect it was more Republicans and not a majority of Republicans who support minor changes and more Democrats support no changes to the health care law.

        Nancy Pelosi more unpopular than Donald Trump

        The Democratic Party has slightly higher favorability than the Republican Party in preliminary data from CNN's national exit poll. About half of voters said they had a positive view of the Democratic Party, while the Republican Party is upside down, with slightly more than 40% saying they had a positive view of the Republicans.
        The downside for Democrats is an extremely low favorable rating for Nancy Pelosi, the woman who would like to again be Speaker of the House if Democrats win control of the House of Representatives. Only about three-in-10 voters had a positive view of Pelosi and more than half had an unfavorable view. In fact, more voters had an unfavorable view of Pelosi than had an unfavorable view of President Trump, according to preliminary results.
        -- 5:56 p.m. ET / Grace Sparks

        Most voters feel good or great about the economy

        President Donald Trump has repeatedly highlighted how good the economy is doing under his watch.
        Many voters agreed. More than two-thirds said the economy is excellent or good, though Republicans were much more likely to feel that way, according to preliminary results from CNN's national exit poll.
        Just under a third of voters said the economy is not good or poor, and bof them were Democrats.
        The economy, however, was not the key issue for many voters this midterm election. It ranked third, behind health care and immigration but well ahead of gun policy. The economy mattered more toRepublicans than Democrats.
        Nearly half of voters felt their financial situation is the same as it was two years ago. Just over a third said it was better, while a little less than 15% said it was worse.
        Republicans were initially running on the tax cut package they passed at the end of 2017, though that fervor faded as the midterms approached. Voters were more muted about the tax cuts' effect on their lives. Nearly half said it had no impact, while just under a quarter said it hurt them. Just over a quarter said they were helped by the tax cuts.
        -- 5:50 p.m. ET / Tami Luhby
        Correction: The percentage of Democrats saying the economy was not good or poor has been corrected.

        Voters decided a long time ago

        A big majority of voters, about two-thirds, made their 2018 election decision before the last month, according to preliminary exit poll results. Only one-in-five said they decided in the last month and even fewer said they made up their minds in the last few days or last week.
        About four-in-five have voted in a midterm election before, but about 15% said that this is the first time they've voted in a midterm. About 10% said they were first-time voters in the 2016 election.
        5:34 p.m. ET / Grace Sparks

        More voted opposing Trump than supporting him

        More than 40% of voters in the 2018 election approve of the job Trump is doing as President, according to the preliminary results from CNN's national exit poll. About three-in-10 said they strongly approve of Trump while almost half said they strongly disapprove of him.
        Almost two-thirds said that Trump was a factor in their vote for the House today. About a quarter said their vote was in support of the President and almost 40% said that their vote was in opposition to him.
        A majority, a little more than half, said things in the country are on the wrong track. About 40% say they're going in the right direction.
        5:20 p.m. ET / Grace Sparks

        This election is about Donald Trump

        Two-thirds of voters say their vote in today's congressional election is about Donald Trump, according to early exit polls, and more say they're showing up at the polls to express opposition than support for the President. The President's approval rating is net negative among the nation's voters, and more say things in the country are on the wrong track than that they are going in the right direction. Still, nearly 7 in 10 say the economy is in good shape, and those who say their personal finances are in better shape now than two years ago outnumber those who feel their finances have worsened.
        About 4 in 10 voters turning out to vote across the country choose health care as the most important problem facing the country, and more, 7 in 10, say the nation's health care system needs major changes. About 2 in 10 each choose the economy and immigration as their top issue, and 1 in 10 say it's gun policy.
        With a historically diverse slate of candidates on ballots nationwide, about half of voters say it's very important to them that more women are elected to public office and that more racial and ethnic minorities are elected.
        A sizeable 1 in 6 voters say this election is the first time they're casting a ballot in a midterm contest.
          -- 5 p.m. ET / Jennifer Agiesta
          These figures will change and be updated throughout the evening. Please check CNN's Election Center for the most updated data.

          Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

          =>
          ***********************************************
          Post Source Here: Exit polls: This election is about Donald Trump
          ************************************
          =>

          ]]>
          6534
          28-year-old woman has beaten cancer 4 timeshttps://moonpixlar.pw/28-year-old-woman-has-beaten-cancer-4-times/ Mon, 12 Nov 2018 14:22:54 +0000 https://moonpixlar.pw/?p=6531
          Marler was diagnosed with a rare disorder called CMMRD that predisposes a person to different cancers. (iStock)

          When Lauren Marler began having disturbing symptoms at the age of 15, she somehow knew it was cancer. After the Midland, Texas, teenager did some of her own research, she realized that she was right. But that was just the beginning of her horrific cancer odyssey. Marler’s doctors discovered that what she had was truly unlucky—but she’s still here to tell her tale.

          In 2005, Marler noticed blood in her stool; she was mortified and too embarrassed to tell anyone. For two years she kept silent until her symptoms worsened. “I looked up my symptoms and knew I had all the signs for colon cancer,” she says. “I freaked out but still couldn’t tell my mom face-to-face, so I wrote her a letter, telling her I knew I had cancer. My mom thought I was overreacting, and even the doctor she took me to said it was constipation.” When her symptoms persisted after a high-fiber diet, doctors performed an endoscopy and colonoscopy and confirmed what Marler had known all along: At 17, she had full-blown colon cancer. Learn the 6 silent signs of colon cancer you might be missing.

          “When I woke up, my mom looked like she had just seen a ghost. The doctor who performed the tests was crying. She said she had never seen a case as bad as mine, and that I needed to get to the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center immediately,” Marler recalls. There she met with Miguel Rodriguez-Bigas, MD, FACS, FASCRS, who removed Marler’s entire colon and almost all of her rectum—leaving only enough to allow her to retain normal digestive function and to avoid having an ileostomy bag for life.

          But just nine months later, the cancer returned. “When my mom told me, I was cleaning my room. I just felt like, ‘You’ve got to be kidding me. I just want to be a normal kid.'”

          After another surgery, three months of chemotherapy, and radiation, Marler believed that her cancer battles had to be over. Find out the 14 cancer warning signs your doctor should never ignore.

          Then, during a routine scan to ensure that she was still in remission five years later, 23-year-old Marler got the call she never thought she’d get again. “I was at work and the doctor called to tell me that the scan showed a spot in my uterus. A biopsy of the polyp revealed it was endometrial cancer, and an aggressive one. We went back to MD Anderson to meet with Pedro T. Ramirez, MD, who recommended a full hysterectomy. “Luckily, that time, the cancer was contained to the polyp, so I didn’t need chemotherapy,” she explains. Read these 21 reasons to feel hopeful about medicine’s progress in fighting cancer.

          Puzzled by Marler’s history, Dr. Rodriguez-Bigas recommended that she get genetic testing. The testing revealed the bad news: Marler had an incredibly rare disorder called CMMRD (constitutional mismatch repair deficiency—it had just recently been identified by a researcher in Australia). Dr. Rodriguez-Bigas explained that the disorder predisposes a person to different cancers—the body fails to repair the cell mutations that lead to cancer. Learn about these 37 ways to cut your cancer risk, according to science.

          Both of her parents have Lynch syndrome, a mutation in a gene called PMS2 that leaves them highly susceptible to colon, endometrial, and other types of cancer. When Marler inherited two bad copies of the gene, it meant that she was extremely vulnerable to a variety of cancers. There is no treatment for the disorder, only preventive care—primarily regular scans to catch any developing cancers early. Armed with an answer for the grief and suffering she had endured for the past decade of her life, Marler actually felt a sense of relief. “It’s heartbreaking, but at least I have an answer. Less than 100 people in the United States have it, and I’m one of them.”

          Three years later, Marler was unable to shake what she thought was a lingering sinus infection. “I just keep coughing—I felt awful. I was nauseated and running a high fever. The ER gave me medication for the nausea and advised me to take Tylenol for the fever.” The next morning, Marler’s mother knew something wasn’t right when Marler refused to go back to the hospital because of the level of pain she felt. Check out these 30 steps you can take to help prevent cancer.

          On this trip to the hospital, Marler was admitted and scanned. Doctors found a suspicious spot on a lymph node and Marler was airlifted back to MD Anderson. “I couldn’t believe it was happening again. The biopsy showed that it was lymphoma, one of the hardest types to treat. The doctors told me the treatment was going to be so grueling that I would hate them by the time it was over. They were right.” Marler endured six different types of chemotherapy simultaneously, one of which was delivered through her spinal cord. She was required to be admitted to the hospital every other week for six days. “I was so weak I couldn’t get off of my couch. I lost all of my hair, and I had severe body aches,” she recalls.

          Today, at 28, Marler is once again in remission—something she definitely doesn’t take for granted. She credits her family for her ability to endure her repeated battles with a smile. She says, “I laugh a lot. That’s one thing my family does really well—we can find the humor in any situation. I’ve always found a way to laugh. I do worry about what’s next, but I can’t let it consume me. I’ve learned to live with it.” Be inspired by these quotes from 34 other cancer survivors

          Marler has some advice to others who might be young and too embarrassed to seek help for uncomfortable symptoms: “Find a way to get the help you need—you have to tell someone. Even if it’s writing a letter like I did, find someone you’re comfortable with that you can tell. If I had waited longer, I would have died in my 20s. Find a way to get help.” Now read about 50 cancer myths you need to stop believing.

          Click for more from Reader's Digest.

          Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

          =>
          ***********************************************
          See More Here: 28-year-old woman has beaten cancer 4 times
          ************************************
          =>

          ]]>
          Marler was diagnosed with a rare disorder called CMMRD that predisposes a person to different cancers. (iStock)

          When Lauren Marler began having disturbing symptoms at the age of 15, she somehow knew it was cancer. After the Midland, Texas, teenager did some of her own research, she realized that she was right. But that was just the beginning of her horrific cancer odyssey. Marler’s doctors discovered that what she had was truly unlucky—but she’s still here to tell her tale.

          In 2005, Marler noticed blood in her stool; she was mortified and too embarrassed to tell anyone. For two years she kept silent until her symptoms worsened. “I looked up my symptoms and knew I had all the signs for colon cancer,” she says. “I freaked out but still couldn’t tell my mom face-to-face, so I wrote her a letter, telling her I knew I had cancer. My mom thought I was overreacting, and even the doctor she took me to said it was constipation.” When her symptoms persisted after a high-fiber diet, doctors performed an endoscopy and colonoscopy and confirmed what Marler had known all along: At 17, she had full-blown colon cancer. Learn the 6 silent signs of colon cancer you might be missing.

          “When I woke up, my mom looked like she had just seen a ghost. The doctor who performed the tests was crying. She said she had never seen a case as bad as mine, and that I needed to get to the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center immediately,” Marler recalls. There she met with Miguel Rodriguez-Bigas, MD, FACS, FASCRS, who removed Marler’s entire colon and almost all of her rectum—leaving only enough to allow her to retain normal digestive function and to avoid having an ileostomy bag for life.

          But just nine months later, the cancer returned. “When my mom told me, I was cleaning my room. I just felt like, ‘You’ve got to be kidding me. I just want to be a normal kid.'”

          After another surgery, three months of chemotherapy, and radiation, Marler believed that her cancer battles had to be over. Find out the 14 cancer warning signs your doctor should never ignore.

          Then, during a routine scan to ensure that she was still in remission five years later, 23-year-old Marler got the call she never thought she’d get again. “I was at work and the doctor called to tell me that the scan showed a spot in my uterus. A biopsy of the polyp revealed it was endometrial cancer, and an aggressive one. We went back to MD Anderson to meet with Pedro T. Ramirez, MD, who recommended a full hysterectomy. “Luckily, that time, the cancer was contained to the polyp, so I didn’t need chemotherapy,” she explains. Read these 21 reasons to feel hopeful about medicine’s progress in fighting cancer.

          Puzzled by Marler’s history, Dr. Rodriguez-Bigas recommended that she get genetic testing. The testing revealed the bad news: Marler had an incredibly rare disorder called CMMRD (constitutional mismatch repair deficiency—it had just recently been identified by a researcher in Australia). Dr. Rodriguez-Bigas explained that the disorder predisposes a person to different cancers—the body fails to repair the cell mutations that lead to cancer. Learn about these 37 ways to cut your cancer risk, according to science.

          Both of her parents have Lynch syndrome, a mutation in a gene called PMS2 that leaves them highly susceptible to colon, endometrial, and other types of cancer. When Marler inherited two bad copies of the gene, it meant that she was extremely vulnerable to a variety of cancers. There is no treatment for the disorder, only preventive care—primarily regular scans to catch any developing cancers early. Armed with an answer for the grief and suffering she had endured for the past decade of her life, Marler actually felt a sense of relief. “It’s heartbreaking, but at least I have an answer. Less than 100 people in the United States have it, and I’m one of them.”

          Three years later, Marler was unable to shake what she thought was a lingering sinus infection. “I just keep coughing—I felt awful. I was nauseated and running a high fever. The ER gave me medication for the nausea and advised me to take Tylenol for the fever.” The next morning, Marler’s mother knew something wasn’t right when Marler refused to go back to the hospital because of the level of pain she felt. Check out these 30 steps you can take to help prevent cancer.

          On this trip to the hospital, Marler was admitted and scanned. Doctors found a suspicious spot on a lymph node and Marler was airlifted back to MD Anderson. “I couldn’t believe it was happening again. The biopsy showed that it was lymphoma, one of the hardest types to treat. The doctors told me the treatment was going to be so grueling that I would hate them by the time it was over. They were right.” Marler endured six different types of chemotherapy simultaneously, one of which was delivered through her spinal cord. She was required to be admitted to the hospital every other week for six days. “I was so weak I couldn’t get off of my couch. I lost all of my hair, and I had severe body aches,” she recalls.

          Today, at 28, Marler is once again in remission—something she definitely doesn’t take for granted. She credits her family for her ability to endure her repeated battles with a smile. She says, “I laugh a lot. That’s one thing my family does really well—we can find the humor in any situation. I’ve always found a way to laugh. I do worry about what’s next, but I can’t let it consume me. I’ve learned to live with it.” Be inspired by these quotes from 34 other cancer survivors

          Marler has some advice to others who might be young and too embarrassed to seek help for uncomfortable symptoms: “Find a way to get the help you need—you have to tell someone. Even if it’s writing a letter like I did, find someone you’re comfortable with that you can tell. If I had waited longer, I would have died in my 20s. Find a way to get help.” Now read about 50 cancer myths you need to stop believing.

          Click for more from Reader's Digest.

          Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

          =>
          ***********************************************
          See More Here: 28-year-old woman has beaten cancer 4 times
          ************************************
          =>

          ]]>
          6531
          Sean Hannity Hypes Trump Again, Says Democrats Winning House ‘Is Meaningless’https://moonpixlar.pw/sean-hannity-hypes-trump-again-says-democrats-winning-house-is-meaningless/ Mon, 12 Nov 2018 09:55:44 +0000 https://moonpixlar.pw/?p=6528

          Fox News host Sean Hannity, who drew widespread criticism when he campaigned on stage with President Donald Trump on Monday, was keen to play down projections that Democrats would flip the House in Tuesday’s midterm elections.

          Hannity tweeted late Tuesday that the election results had been “a massive win” for Trump and the Republicans whom the president had campaigned for.

          Democrats seizing control of the House was “meaningless,” he added.

          Hannity also blasted “most in the media” for being “absolutely clueless,” echoing his “fake news” media rant when he was on stage with Trump in Missouri.

          Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

          =>
          ***********************************************
          Originally Published Here: Sean Hannity Hypes Trump Again, Says Democrats Winning House ‘Is Meaningless’
          ************************************
          =>

          ]]>

          Fox News host Sean Hannity, who drew widespread criticism when he campaigned on stage with President Donald Trump on Monday, was keen to play down projections that Democrats would flip the House in Tuesday’s midterm elections.

          Hannity tweeted late Tuesday that the election results had been “a massive win” for Trump and the Republicans whom the president had campaigned for.

          Democrats seizing control of the House was “meaningless,” he added.

          Hannity also blasted “most in the media” for being “absolutely clueless,” echoing his “fake news” media rant when he was on stage with Trump in Missouri.

          Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

          =>
          ***********************************************
          Originally Published Here: Sean Hannity Hypes Trump Again, Says Democrats Winning House ‘Is Meaningless’
          ************************************
          =>

          ]]>
          6528
          Children are being ‘datafied from birth’https://moonpixlar.pw/children-are-being-datafied-from-birth/ Mon, 12 Nov 2018 05:33:51 +0000 https://moonpixlar.pw/?p=6525
          Image copyright Getty Images

          The children's commissioner for England is calling on internet giants and toy-makers to be more transparent about the data they are collecting on children.

          Today's children are the first to be "datafied" from birth and little thought has been given to the consequences, a report for her says.

          Who Knows What about Me? calls for a statutory duty of care between social media giants and their younger users.

          And it urges the government to consider strengthening data protection laws.

          'Canary in mine'

          The report also highlights how very young children are now using toys that are connected to the internet.

          These gather personal messages and information that may be insecure and open to attack from hackers, it says.

          The report quotes research led by Sonia Livingstone, who describes children as the "canary in the coal mine for wider society" - the first to encounter new technology and its risks before many adults are even aware of them.

          It says:

          • children should be taught in schools about how their data is collected and for what purposes
          • where a toy collects any video or audio generated by a child, this should be made explicit in a prominent part of the packaging or its accompanying information
          • using language children understand, companies should explain clearly in their terms and conditions what data is collected and how it will be used

          The report estimates:

          • between the ages of 11 and 16, children post on social media 26 times a day, on average
          • by the time they reach adulthood, they are likely to have posted 70,000 times
          • by the age of 13, a child's parents will have posted on average 1,300 photos and videos of them to social media

          There is also:

          • the data gathered when children use the internet
          • tracking devices and apps used by parents to keep tabs on their offspring
          • the biometric data held by public bodies such as schools and the NHS

          The report warns that there could be risks to young people where profiling of internet usage is utilised in areas of life where it can have deeper ramifications, such as the judicial system or the education system.

          One worrying scenario it gives is if a health insurance company used information posted by a child on social media about their mental health as part of its decision on whether to issue a policy or how much to charge.

          Technology develops

          Anne Longfield, the Children's Commissioner for England, said: "We need to stop and think about what this means for children's lives now and how it may impact on their future lives as adults.

          "We simply do not know what the consequences of all this information about our children will be.

          "Companies that make apps, toys and other products used by children need to stop filling them with trackers and put their terms and conditions in language that children understand.

          "And crucially the government needs to monitor the situation and refine data protection legislation if needed, so that children are genuinely protected - especially as technology develops."

          Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

          =>
          ***********************************************
          See Full Article Here: Children are being ‘datafied from birth’
          ************************************
          =>

          ]]>
          Image copyright Getty Images

          The children's commissioner for England is calling on internet giants and toy-makers to be more transparent about the data they are collecting on children.

          Today's children are the first to be "datafied" from birth and little thought has been given to the consequences, a report for her says.

          Who Knows What about Me? calls for a statutory duty of care between social media giants and their younger users.

          And it urges the government to consider strengthening data protection laws.

          'Canary in mine'

          The report also highlights how very young children are now using toys that are connected to the internet.

          These gather personal messages and information that may be insecure and open to attack from hackers, it says.

          The report quotes research led by Sonia Livingstone, who describes children as the "canary in the coal mine for wider society" - the first to encounter new technology and its risks before many adults are even aware of them.

          It says:

          • children should be taught in schools about how their data is collected and for what purposes
          • where a toy collects any video or audio generated by a child, this should be made explicit in a prominent part of the packaging or its accompanying information
          • using language children understand, companies should explain clearly in their terms and conditions what data is collected and how it will be used

          The report estimates:

          • between the ages of 11 and 16, children post on social media 26 times a day, on average
          • by the time they reach adulthood, they are likely to have posted 70,000 times
          • by the age of 13, a child's parents will have posted on average 1,300 photos and videos of them to social media

          There is also:

          • the data gathered when children use the internet
          • tracking devices and apps used by parents to keep tabs on their offspring
          • the biometric data held by public bodies such as schools and the NHS

          The report warns that there could be risks to young people where profiling of internet usage is utilised in areas of life where it can have deeper ramifications, such as the judicial system or the education system.

          One worrying scenario it gives is if a health insurance company used information posted by a child on social media about their mental health as part of its decision on whether to issue a policy or how much to charge.

          Technology develops

          Anne Longfield, the Children's Commissioner for England, said: "We need to stop and think about what this means for children's lives now and how it may impact on their future lives as adults.

          "We simply do not know what the consequences of all this information about our children will be.

          "Companies that make apps, toys and other products used by children need to stop filling them with trackers and put their terms and conditions in language that children understand.

          "And crucially the government needs to monitor the situation and refine data protection legislation if needed, so that children are genuinely protected - especially as technology develops."

          Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

          =>
          ***********************************************
          See Full Article Here: Children are being ‘datafied from birth’
          ************************************
          =>

          ]]>
          6525